Science On The Run: Tortoise (Women) And The Hare (Men)?

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Most marathoners tend to run faster in the first half of their race. To explore this further, a recent article suggests that non-elite men are more likely to slow their pace in the marathon, as compared to non-elite women.

Is Energy Stored ‘Intendoned?’

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Image by Dr. James Stoxen

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

The long tendons of the lower leg are often compared to springs, thought to store and release mechanical energy during running. Tendons, unlike muscles, do not consume energy during running. So, it is widely accepted that tendons will ‘save energy’ by reducing the metabolic work of the muscles during running.

Science On The Run: Explaining the Kenyan Advantage In A Moment (Arm)

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Image by Huei-Ming Chai, National Taiwan University School of Physical Therapy

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

It is believed that at the highest level of running performance, running economy is the most crucial factor dictating performance. So, who better than a homogenous sample of some of the best distance runners in the world to challenge this idea? An international team of researchers published an article in the January issue of Journal of Sports Sciences, investigating the relationship between running economy and running performance in elite Kenyan distance runners. [PubMed abstract]

Science on the Run: To Sit Or Stand, Is That Really The Question?

Sitting at desk

Image by Mike Licht, courtesy Flickr Creative Commons

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

We have all heard it, sitting is the new smoking, right? Yes, the stats are alarming for how much time we spend in a sedentary state, but is simply standing enough? Before you rush out to buy your standing desk, consider that ‘be less inactive’ may be a more appropriate message than ‘stand more.’

Science on the Run: Milk Better Calves From Your Marathon Training

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Science on the Run
Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Runners have long been admired for their well-sculpted calves, which is perhaps why a group of researchers from James Madison University investigated the effect of marathon training on the calf musculature of recreational runners. All fun aside, they found that running really can modify the architecture of the calf muscle.

Science On The Run: Gait Expectations

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Science on the Run
Linking current research to running

 By Nikki Reiter

‘Change your mechanics to be a better runner’ or ‘Your body selects the best way to run.’ You’ve heard both sides of the debate, but is it possible to change your gait, and is it even worthwhile?