Science on the Run: The Cost of Eating and Running

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

In endurance running, a lighter body means a reduced cost of running, making it easier to achieve better running results. Research has been performed to determine the effect of various factors affecting running performance, such as if different body size, shape, and composition.

In a recent study, it was found that along with losing fat mass, gaining fat free mass allowed for an increased ability of the body to store and release elastic energy during running, which reduced the cost of running.

Science on the Run: Bad Posture = Bad Runner

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

As a fidgety-runner-type-who-hates-sitting-at-her-desk and worries about maintaining good posture, I’ve been incorporating stretching a few times a day, in addition to multiple walks to fill up my cup at the water station and my mid-day run (with all these breaks, you probably wonder how I ever get any work done!) Personally, I’m more productive this way as it allows me to work in concentrated time slots with a clear mind.

Science on the Run: Not All Fitness Trackers Are Created Equal

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Do you own or are you considering a fitness tracker? These monitors claim to be a great way to measure energy expenditure and physical activity levels and can help enhance self-monitoring for behavior change. As many of us are desk workers, it’s important to track how much physical activity we are truly getting in a day for our general health. When it comes to training, it’s also invaluable to know how hard we are actually working in order to plan proper recovery.

A recent publication presents an evaluation of the validity, or accuracy, of a variety of industry-leading fitness trackers.

Science On The Run: Ultrarunning Spotlight, Part I

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

In this first post of a four-part series on ultra-running, I’ll address some of the physical deterioration associated with ultra-running. While physical activity by way of running is a very healthy endeavor, with extreme exertion comes health risks. A growing number of researchers are investigating whether these risks outweigh the benefits.

Science on the Run: Get Up and Glute!

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

We all know we could work more on our glutes. But who actually commits to it? While I know its importance, I’ve easily lost motivation in my attempts at prehab for many self-proclaimed ‘good’ reasons – change in schedule, fatigue, sickness, or no longer being injured! A physio-runner-friend of mine even setup a three-week challenge, complete with filmed exercises posted on Facebook to make it convenient for her and her peers to stay on track. I think 90% of us failed to do the exercises every day.

Science on the Run: Pesky Ankle or Knee Issues? Consider Your Midsole.

UntitledLinking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

With all the different types of running shoes on the market, have you ever stopped to wonder whether a softer or harder shoe truly affects how you run? Do they prevent injuries? I’ve previously discussed the importance of perceived comfort when choosing a shoe. Here I present how the qualities of the shoe midsole can relate to injury potential.

Science on the Run: Carbohydrates For A Kick!

UntitledLinking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Pacing is our body’s way of preserving energy and it is suggested to occur both consciously and subconsciously from our brain and local muscles. Pacing requires a complex integration of brain and muscle signals that is highly debated as the Central Governor theory (the brain) vs. the Peripheral Fatigue model (read more here) with the purpose of keeping our bodies from harming themselves through excessive exertion.

Science on the Run: “Better Short Than Never!”

By Nikki Reiter

Do you plan your workout intensity? Does this ever deter you from your workout effort, or maybe deter you from starting the workout altogether?

Research has been published comparing rating of perceived exertion (RPE) responses before, during and after continuous and ‘high-intensity interval training’ (HIIT) exercise trials.

Apparently, RPE has been shown to change in relation to the same session, depending on ‘when’ it is asked.

Science on the Run: Running Shoes And The Law Of Diminishing Returns

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Every once and a while, a wonderful little thing happens. A researcher decides to do a systematic review of a topic and then presents their findings in a paper. I get a little excited when the topic pertains to running.

Recently, a team of researchers reviewed how footwear could affect running performance and economy. Since running economy (RE) is a commonly accepted way to discuss distance running performance, it would be great to know the general consensus amongst publications about the effect of footwear selection on running performance and RE.

Science on the Run: If it Feels Good, Wear It!

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Image courtesy of The Athlete’s Foot Australia

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

I have often held the belief that you will run your best in the shoe that feels most comfortable on your foot. I used to work in a specialty running store and, anecdotally, I was proven correct by observing that customers selected the shoe they think feels best – and that trying to force oneself into a shoe that was not quite ‘right’ never prevailed. To my amusement, this hypothesis was confirmed nearly five years ago when at a conference I asked world-renowned biomechanist and shoe expert, Dr. Benno Nigg, how to select a running shoe. His response was concurrent with the concept of choosing the shoe that is most comfortable.