Jack Daniels: Integrating Hill Training Into Your Marathon Plan

Question: I would like to know your recommendation for integrating hill training into a marathon program. Specifically:

  1. When to start/end training (at what point in a typical 24 week cycle?)
  2. What format of hill training (true Lydiard hill circuits (bound up, recover @ top, stride down, 3X150M strides, repeat), normal :60-:30 second hill reps with short rest (VO2 workout), uphill tempo runs, etc).

Run SMART Coach Jack Daniels: I like to think of hill training as another form of resistance training, and certainly resistance training can benefit a runner.  Resistance training could be hill running, or squats in the gym or circuit training, bounding, or deep-water running, etc.  In other words, training that may be overall beneficial for the development of a runner in terms of holding off injury or developing muscles that may normally become fatigued in races of various distances.

Speed Workouts For A 26.2 Mile Race?

By Mike Smith

A question I get many times from the runners I interact with is “What place does speedwork have in training for a 26 mile race, Mike?” The question is a good one; in a race so far, wouldn’t you want to just get good at running for a long time? Why would anyone need to practice running fast?  It turns out that faster workouts don’t only have to be performed because you want to be a sprinter. These types of workouts can play an important part in preparing for longer races as well.

When To Get New Running Shoes

Question:  Should I get new running shoes for the marathon, and if so – when?

Run SMART Coach Vince Sherry:  This question is a good one (as well as a common one) that marathoners often ask me about one week before the big day. It is most often part of the final pre-marathon panic. In the quest to make sure everything is perfect for race day, runners will look to their shoes at some point. Unfortunately, it’s often when the race is right around the corner, which leads me to my first tip; never purchase running shoes in a pressured state. A rushed decision is not usually a very good one. Try to plan ahead and get your marathon race-day shoes at least two weeks prior to the race. You should be lining up with around 20 to 40 miles on your trainers (less if your wearing racing flats).

If you’re fairly certain that your running shoes have more than 150 miles on them I would recommend getting a fresh pair. It’s not that your current shoes are shot at that point (in fact that’s about half the mileage a modest pair of trainers would give you), they’re just not 100%. The marathon will likely be the toughest event you run all season. You should give your feet as much cushioning as possible on race day. You will likely finish with less wear and tear and recover faster as a result. If you do end up purchasing a new pair a couple of weeks out make sure they are the same model as the shoes you’ve been running in for the current training period. This is not a time to try something new (unless the shoe you’ve been in has been giving you serious trouble).

Read Vince’s complete response at NYDailyNews.com

Yoga For Runners Workshop (NYC)

This Thursday, October 21st from 7:30pm-9:00pm at YogaWorks Westside, Mimi Rosetti will be leading a Yoga For Runners Workshop. All proceeds will go towards the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society. The suggested donation is $25 for the session. To register, call 212-769-9642. Location: 37 W. 65th St. (between CPW and Columbus Ave), 4th floor, New York, NY.

Don’t Let Last Minute Diet Decisions Ruin Your Marathon

Last October, Run SMART coach Alicia Shay put together a comprehensive series on ‘Marathon Nutrition’. She broke it down nicely into four pieces: Day BeforeRace DayDuring the Race and the Day After. We’re amidst fall marathon season and thousands of runners, including many of our clients, have been training and sacrificing all year for this moment. Please don’t let poor nutrition decisions or last minute attempts at trying to gain an edge negate all the training you’ve put in. Be smart and take a good look at each piece Alicia has put together. It’s really great stuff!

Ask a Coach: How To Combine Cross Country And Marathon Training

Question: Luisa has begun her cross country season and is wondering how she can incorporate training sessions for her marathon in January 2010.

Run S.M.A.R.T. Coach:  You can certainly run well over 5k-10k distances off of pure strength or marathon training so I would suggest focusing on your marathon training and treating the cross country races as hard efforts along the way. Make sure to take a little extra recovery time before a race so you’re not completely compromising your cross country season. The only concern is that racing on many weekends during your build-up could conflict with hard long run efforts that are crucial for your marathon. Racing on a Saturday and then doing a long run on Sunday can be super taxing on your body if you have to pull it off several times during your marathon build-up. If possible, try and schedule your faster paced long run efforts on weekends you’re not racing.