Science on the Run: Get Up and Glute!

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

We all know we could work more on our glutes. But who actually commits to it? While I know its importance, I’ve easily lost motivation in my attempts at prehab for many self-proclaimed ‘good’ reasons – change in schedule, fatigue, sickness, or no longer being injured! A physio-runner-friend of mine even setup a three-week challenge, complete with filmed exercises posted on Facebook to make it convenient for her and her peers to stay on track. I think 90% of us failed to do the exercises every day.

Science on the Run: Whip Those Glutes Into Shape!

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Image credit Colorado Physical Therapy Specialists (Medial Heel Whip)

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Glute weakness is often considered one of the main culprits of running injuries. Run too much without the muscular support of the pelvis and core, and BAM! – IT band issues, patellofemoral pain, shin splints, foot pain, etc. Statistically, it has probably happened to each of us at some point in our running careers.

How do you know if you have weak glutes? Chances are if you are a member of today’s society, you are affected to some degree. Prolonged sitting is typically credited with being the reason. How do you know if your glutes are really weak? Well, one gait pattern you can look at is how your foot moves from behind your body at push-off, or whether you experience ‘heel whip.’