Science Meets Technology

Legendary Dr. Jack Daniels got his PhD in Exercise Physiology in the 1960’s and then started testing world-class runners in preparation for the Mexico City Olympics. He began his life’s work learning about how the body reacts to stress in search of how to properly train for running competition. His studies and research led to his invention of the VDOT training tables in the 1970s, popularized in Daniels’ Running Formula.

Today, science meets technology with over 40-years of running science and research wrapped into a mobile app in the palm of your hands. Get the VDOT Calculator on your mobile device and become a faster runner.

iOS:  http://apple.co/19FXszO
Android:  http://bit.ly/24z2k2m

Our Head Coach Leading By Example

“I always say “consistency” is the most important word in training. I try to get out for 2-3 miles everyday unless I’m traveling or not feeling well. Nancy took this picture. We love to run together on this indoor track at SUNY Cortland if the weather outside is bad.”

– Dr. Jack Daniels

Follow Jack on his Facebook page.

New VDOT Coaching Clinic Dates Added!

In 2015, we launched Dr. Daniels’ VDOT Coaching Clinic & Certification. Runner’s World hyped this brand new opportunity for distance coaches to boost their running resumes and we got a huge response quickly selling out all four events (New York (2x), San Francisco and Toronto). Featured guest speakers included Olympians Lynn Jennings and Malindi Elmore, ultrarunning’s best athlete Rob Krar and legendary coach Frank Gagliano.

“I Feel Great And Usually Finish Workouts With A Little Bit Left”

Shannon Siragusa was kind enough to let us share her feedback as she follows her custom Jack Daniels’ 15-week Marathon Plan on VDOT O2. We loved her comments because Jack’s methodology with VDOT is to find the max benefit for the least amount of stress on the body. We know someone is training properly when they allude to the fact that the workouts are hard but doable.

Canadian Running Interviews Jack

Canadian Running sat down with our very own Dr. Jack Daniels during the last VDOT Coaching Clinic in Toronto, Ontario. They discussed the recent doping scandals in our sport, his favorite shoe, the best performance he’s witnessed and more. Enjoy!

Part 1

Dr. Jack Daniels’ VDOT Clinic Review And Lessons

By Malindi Elmore

I am sitting on the brand new addition to the WestJet fleet, Juliet, thinking about my great weekend in Toronto as part of The Run SMART Project’s VDOT Coaching Clinic & Certification with Dr. Jack Daniels. The new airplane, a 676, is irrelevant information to this article, but as a fan of aircrafts and running, I think it is cool to test-ride this new giant addition that will allow WestJet to offer direct flights from Calgary to Glasgow next year!

Anthony DiAngelus Runs Down A BQ In His First Marathon

Anthony DiAngelus trained for his first marathon and a BQ of 3:25 (2.5 minutes padding). He was consistent with his training and nailed it on his first try with a 3:21:23 [full results].
“Your plan was instrumental in getting me to within striking distance. The rest was heart and soul 😜. Thank You! Please send my regards to Coach Daniels.”

Get Your Heat-Adjusted Pace For Chicago This Weekend

Chicago Marathon organizers are expecting a high of 75 degrees this Sunday. Ideal marathon temps are generally in the mid-to-high 40’s fahrenheit, so it’s important to adjust your pace early to avoid a major meltdown (vicious pun intended) 😉 in the second half.

In the example pictured above, someone shooting for a 3:49 marathon would typically average 8:44 per mile. To avoid running a harder effort than you’re trained for in warmer conditions, if you click advanced features on the VDOT Calculator and add in an anticipated temp of 68 degrees (assuming mid-race conditions), the equivalent effort in those temps is about 7 seconds slower or 8:51 per mile. Over a 26.2 mile race that type of discrepancy in your pacing can make the difference between hitting the wall and losing lots of time in the last 8-10 miles and staying relatively steady throughout.

Use our running calculator (embedded below) to determine your heat-adjusted marathon pace and follow Dr. Daniels’ advice:

I’d go for the heat-adjusted pace for 15-20 miles, then if feeling OK, try picking it up a  little.  Much better to run a little slower than you would like to have done, and finish being able to say, “I think I could have gone a little faster,” than to end up saying, “I wish I hadn’t gone out so fast.”