Part I: How To Become A Faster Runner Through Cross Training

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By Malindi Elmore

Why do so many runners loath cross training? I know that I was firmly in the I-hate-cross-training camp for too many years. I think it is a combination of factors that result in this hatred for something that is beneficial to your running. Over the course of my 20-year career as a runner I have had more experience cross training than I care to count – 6 major injuries, pregnancy and a transition to being a multi-sport athlete has required that I sweat out hours aqua-jogging, biking, swimming, etc.

The Danger Of Cross Training When You’re Injured

Jack makes an important point late in this video around the 1:52 mark about the dangers of cross training when you’re injured. Cross training is good to incorporate within a running routine and also as a means of conditioning or rehab if you suffer a running injury. The risk is when runners come back from that injury after cross training like crazy to avoid losing a lot of fitness. All that time you’re stressing your heart but not your legs like they would be when running. So, many athletes quickly get hurt again because they come back too fast. Basically, you’ve got to let your legs catch up again!

Dr. Jack Daniels On Cross Training

The latest Thirsty Thursday edition with Dr. Jack Daniels brought to you by Flotrack and Saucony is a dandy. Jack discusses the advantages and dangers of incorporating cross training into your running routine. He also makes a wonderful point about not adding in new stress over the last 3-4 weeks before your goal race.

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