What’s Your Spring Marathon Plan?

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Run SMART client Erin Strout flexing her way down the home stretch to a new PR at the 2010 Boston Marathon.

We’ve compiled a list of the most popular spring half and full marathons our clients are doing in 2014 if there’s still enough time to customize a plan on our new app. We’ve also included when your custom training plan would start for each race.

If you don’t have a race scheduled yet sign up and customize your plan before the dates below.

  1. Scranton Half Marathon – April 6th, 2014
    1. 12 week plan starts 1/12
  2. Boston Marathon – April 21st, 2014
    1. 15 week plan starts 1/6
  3. Big Sur Marathon – April 27th, 2014
    1. 15 week plan starts 1/13
  4. New Jersey Marathon – April 27th, 2014
    1. 15 week plan starts 1/13
  5. Country Music Nashville Marathon – April 26th, 2014
    1. 15 week plan starts 1/11
  6. Cincinnati Flying Pig Marathon – May 4th, 2014
    1. 15 week plan starts 1/19
  7. Vermont City Marathon – May 25th, 2014
    1. 18 week plan starts 1/19
    2. 15 week plan starts 2/9

Any questions about which race would be the best option for you please email us at [email protected].

Steve Rossler Gets His Boston Qualifier

Run SMART client Steve Rossler qualified for the Boston Marathon last week in Grand Rapids. The 53-year-old from Newton, IA finished 29th out of 102 in his age group in 3:38:10. [Full results] He’s now only 30 seconds away from his marathon lifetime best from 2009. Hey, 50 is the new 40!

Steve’s pacing was really strong throughout in true Jack Daniels’ fashion. His pace per mile for the first half was 8:19, just one second faster per mile than his overall pace.

Henry Jungling Qualifies For Boston At Bemidji Blue Ox Marathon

Jack Daniels’ Training Plan customer Henry Jungling broke his longtime goal of running sub-4 in the marathon. This past weekend at the Bemidji Blue Ox Marathon the 66-year old from Aplington, IA got his Boston Qualifier with a 3:58:21, finishing 4th in his age group. [Full Results]

After the race his son was kind enough to share his results and pass along some feedback.

His previous PR was 4:12:xx but he had struggled in his last two marathons and after a disappointing Dallas marathon last December, almost gave up on his dream of a sub-4 and a BQ time. On Saturday, he ran a 3:58:21 and qualified for Boston at the age of 66!He said he felt the training left him feeling strong and fresh on race day as opposed to previous years where he felt a little beat down.

Ask Dr. Jack Daniels: What Should I Do From Now Until Boston Marathon Training Starts?

Question:  What should I do from now until December when my training for the Boston Marathon starts?

Jack Daniels:  I’d suggest each person thinks about what total weekly mileage they may set as a PEAK amount (for during the final 18 weeks) and try to gradually build up to 80% of that amount by the start of about 18 weeks to go in December. Do not increase weekly mileage any more often than every 3rd or 4th week. You can also start getting used to a weekly Long run, which is 25-30% of each week’s total mileage.

If possible you should try getting used to a Long run on Mondays (the day of Boston), but Sunday afternoon can work as well. Also sometimes on Sunday morning so you are used to that time of day for long efforts. Get used to running during warm parts of the day, but not in real heat (stay around 60 degrees or less is best).

To customize Jack’s Boston Marathon Training Plan visit: http://runsmartproject.com/coaching/boston-marathon/

Start Customizing Your Boston Marathon Training

We’ve got brand new training plans recently created by legendary coach Jack Daniels. He designed them specifically to prepare you for the rolling hills of Boston. They have never been released before and are only available through Run SMART. On these plans Jack tells you which workouts you should be doing on uphills, downhills and rolling hills to be ready for Boston’s course.

Start customizing your Boston plan today.

Preparing For The Boston Marathon Course

By Dr. Jack Daniels

There are a few considerations to keep in mind when training for the Boston Marathon. First, overall, the course is a little downhill, but with some definite uphill running along the way.

Second, as with any course, especially during the spring, weather conditions can vary a fair bit. Often there is a breeze coming at you in Boston, since you are running toward the ocean to your East, and ocean breezes often blow inland. Now and then Boston can get a pretty solid tailwind when a weather system is blowing in from the northwest.

Third, and maybe most importantly, the first five miles of the Boston course in downhill and it is easy to put in some faster-than-average mile times in those first five. It is not bad to take advantage of those early downhill miles, but it is usual for your quads to take a beating as a result of downhill running and if you are not used to it, the latter miles at Boston can be a real struggle.

The idea is to take a little advantage of the first five miles (by going a few seconds faster than you plan to average over the entire course), but to realize you will also be losing some time between miles 16 and 22 when there is a fair bit of uphill running to be done.  However, if your legs are used to some downhill running and the early downhills don’t cause a problem later on, the final 3 or 4 miles are also downhill and you can take advantage of those toward the end of the race.

Overall, on a calm and nice day, and with a nice steady effort, the Boston course can allow you to run a little more than a minute faster than a perfectly flat course will allow. The key is to do some training over undulating terrain, including some prolonged gradual downhill running so your legs are used to doing that and will not let you down over the Boston course. Hopefully, the program that we are supplying you with will prepare you for a good performance and one that is not disappointing. Remember that the weather of the day can have major effect on performance so be prepared for whatever is thrown at you. Take advantage of the advantages and minimize the disadvantages that you have to face.

Training for Boston? Customize one of Jack’s Boston Marathon Training Plans, specifically designed to help you prepare for the rolling hills.

Tricky Tanksley Sets 34 Minute PR, Qualifies For Boston Marathon

Jack Daniels Training Plan customer Tricky Tanksley set a new PR at the Delaware & Lehigh Heritage Marathon this past weekend. Tricky was scheduled to run the NYC Marathon but made a last minute switch after it got cancelled. When she signed up for her plan she had run three marathons all over four hours. We were super excited she was able to find a another marathon let alone PR by 34 minutes – on a trail course too!

After the race, Tricky sent us a note, “Thanks to a great training plan set up by Vince Sherry, I was able to qualify for Boston today by running a 3:27:33 marathon!! That’s a PR by 34 mins:)”

Mir Shafiee Gets Boston Qualifier At Ottawa Marathon

We’re excited to announce that Run SMART client Mir Shafiee qualified for the Boston Marathon this weekend at the Ottawa Marathon! He paced himself brilliantly finishing 30th out of 498 finishers in the M40-44 age group and 202nd overall out of almost 5,000 finishers. His official time was 3:07:03, 10 minutes faster than his previous best marathon. He split 1:33:15 at the halfway mark. [Full results].

Mir works with Run SMART head coach Jack Daniels.

Cathrine Wolden Finishes 37th At Boston Marathon

Run SMART client Cathrine Wolden finished 37th female overall at the 2012 Boston Marathon. She managed to run 3:02:29 under extremely difficult conditions with temps reaching the 80’s towards the second half of her race. Complete results.

Big congrats to Cathrine for such a brave race and her coach Alicia Shay for preparing her so well to run under those conditions.

Boston Marathon Racing Tips

We asked Run SMART coaches Heidi Peoples and Ann Alyanak for some last minute Boston Marathon tips. Both coaches know the course well. Ann was 8th female overall at Boston in 2007 and Heidi ran 2:45 at Boston in 2010.

Heidi Peoples:  The Boston Marathon is an incredible event but can definitely be overwhelming. I felt like an ant in an anthill following crowds to the expo, church, subways, dinner, and even the hotel. Everyone seems like they are going the same place, doing the same things to prepare for the marathon. Mentally it can be exhausting! Since I ran in the elite field of women, my experience was a bit unique – no crowds at the start, and the field of women separated rather quickly. I went out fast to stay with a group, and paid for it at the end of the race.