Olympian Lynn Jennings To Speak At Next VDOT Clinic

We’re excited to announce that one of the greatest female distance runners of all time will be our featured guest speaker at the next VDOT Coaching Clinic on November 7th in New York City.

Olympic medalist, three-time World XC Champion and American record-holder, Lynn Jennings, will be joining Dr. Jack Daniels to share her experiences as both a coach and athlete. Lynn’s talk will focus on the “Importance Of A Coach And Teaching Your Athlete to Be Self-Sufficient.”

Getting My BQ

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Tim Jones, Jack Daniels and Brian Rosetti at the VDOT Clinic

VDOT O2 aficionado, Tim Jones, shares his BQ success story while following a custom plan from Dr. Jack Daniels on our training calendar. He includes a review of the app and interview with our founder, Brian Rosetti.

Official VDOT Calculator Now Available On iPhones

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The iPhone version of the Official VDOT Running Calculator is now available for download (FREE) in the app store. This follows our first mobile release on Android earlier this year.

We worked hard to keep the design simple and crisp but at the same time we wanted the functionality to serve many needs for runners and coaches. For instance, our calculator’s main use case is to calculate your VDOT to help determine training paces and equivalent performances. But you can also use it simply to calculate race paces, determine how much distance you covered by entering pace and time or determine how long a run is by entering time and pace.

Let’s dig in to our main use case – calculating your VDOT!

First VDOT O2 Coaching Clinic In The Books

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After selling out in just four weeks 75 coaches from across the country convened in NYC for the 1st Inaugural VDOT O2 Coaching Clinic and Certification. The clinic marks the first opportunity coaches can get certified by Dr. Jack Daniels upon passing his VDOT O2 Distance Coaching Exam online.

What’s Your VDOT?

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Today we launched the VDOT Running Tee, designed by Dr. Jack Daniels. Read Jack’s backstory, follow the link and find out what level your top race performance earns in the VDOT scale.

VDOT Calculator On Android

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Our VDOT Calculator has gone mobile! If you have an Android phone you can now download our FREE app in the Google Play store.

Expect the iPhone version in the App Store sometime in early March.

VDOT Running Calculator Countdown: Testing Athletes

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Jack testing athletes in Tahoe in preparation for the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.

We’re counting down to the first release of the VDOT Running Calculator on Android and want to recognize how it evolved into our upcoming mobile technology.

It all began with testing done on athletes in the 60’s that helped produce the world renown VDOT formulas. Today, thousands of runners  across the world have utilized this research to become faster/stronger runners.

Presenting A New Distance Coaching Clinic And Certification

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The Run SMART Project presents the first ever VDOT O2 Coaching Clinic and Certification by Dr. Jack Daniels. This year’s special event will also feature coaching legend Frank Gagliano, aka “Gags”. Running coaches of all levels and stripes (high school, college, club, charity, private) are welcome to join us on Sat, March 21st in New York City.

As part of this coaching seminar each coach will have the opportunity to earn their VDOT Running Coach certification by passing Dr. Daniels’ online exam following the clinic. Each guest will have up to three months to study the material covered by Dr. Daniels and can review Daniels’ Running Formula before taking the test. Pass and get certified by the “World’s Best Running Coach”!

To learn more and register for this event check out:  VDOT O2 Coaching Clinic

What’s Your Actual Marathon Race Pace?

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In 2013, Runner’s World published a piece by Amby Burfoot that concluded most runners are better off listening to their bodies versus following a formulaic pacing approach, according to a study he cites.

Amby reviews the marathon data and writes

The runners held their pace for 13.1 miles, but then slowed dramatically. But wait. We all know The Wall doesn’t hit you until 20 miles. There’s no physiological reasons for marathoners to suddenly fatigue at the halfway point. What gives? Why did the runners crash at 13.1 miles?

My guess: The runners were relying too heavily on high goal-setting, heart-rate monitors, GPS systems, equivalent-performance tables, and the like. In other words, they used one or several of these tools to pick a goal pace faster than their actual race-day fitness. That’s what we high-success, high-determination, Type A runners often do.