Dr. Jack Daniels On Cross Training

The latest Thirsty Thursday edition with Dr. Jack Daniels brought to you by Flotrack and Saucony is a dandy. Jack discusses the advantages and dangers of incorporating cross training into your running routine. He also makes a wonderful point about not adding in new stress over the last 3-4 weeks before your goal race.

Track and Field Videos on Flotrack

Learning How To Recover Properly

Learning How To Recover Properly

By Brian Rosetti

Based on my experience as an athlete and a coach, one of the most overlooked components of a runner’s training plan is ‘recovery.’ Naturally, athletes are more focused on the work they must put in to reach their goals, not the time or habits necessary to recover from this work. Running is unlike any other sport in that the body needs more time to recover and bounce back than usual. If you don’t recover properly then chances are you’re going to get sick, under-perform or get injured. My first priority when working with runners is to keep them healthy, even if that means under-training them. The longer you stay healthy the more consistent you are and only after lengthy periods of consistent training is when real results come. 

Three Fundamental Principles Of Running

Three Fundamental Principles Of Running

By Blake Boldon

This summer I was asked to speak at a couple high school camps and without a specific knowledge of everything covered at the camp, my challenge was developing a relevant subject.  I thought about what lessons are universally applicable to all track and field athletes and distance runners no matter their competitive level or age.  After reflecting on my years as a coach and as an athlete I found three fundamental principles.

Altitude Training By Dr. Jack Daniels, Part III

Part III of Jack’s Altitude Training Series focuses on, “What is the best altitude for living and training high?”

Any altitude at which you can perform quality training is useful, but moderate altitudes, in the range of 1600-2600 meters (5000-8500 feet), are felt to be ideal. Flagstaff’s 2134 meter (7000 feet) elevation is certainly in the middle of that range. At this altitude there are seldom any problems with altitude sickness and normal amounts and relative intensities of training are generally easy to maintain.

Next week we’ll post “How much improvement will take place with acclimatization?”

Is A Training Plan Essential?

Is A Training Plan Essential?

By Rod Koborsi

As runners, we ask numerous questions to help us feel better, train harder and run faster. These questions vary from whether minimalist footwear is all the hype to how far should I run be before a marathon. While these questions (and everything in between) may be good ones to ask, they sometimes forget one of the most important questions, “Is a training plan essential?”

Altitude Training By Dr. Jack Daniels, Part II

Part II of Jack’s Altitude Training Series focuses on, “How long does it takes to adapt to altitude.”

As already mentioned, in slow-speed endurance events, altitude-best performances will never match sea-level bests, but they will definitely improve with altitude training. In as few as two weeks, altitude performance will be noticeably improved. Within about six weeks of altitude training, acclimatization will be quite complete.

Mike Smith’s Three Most Important Tips for Beginner Runners

My Three Most Important Tips for Beginner Runners

By Mike Smith

One of the greatest joys I get as a coach is assisting someone to get off the ground for the first time. While the action of running is a simple activity, starting a running program isn’t as easy as it looks. One of the very reasons I started coaching was to help people go about this activity in a way that sets them up for success. Here are my three biggest tips for beginner runners:

Altitude Training by Dr. Jack Daniels, Part I

Dr. Jack put together a great document of Altitude Training FAQs for our running retreats in Flagstaff. It’s broken down into several parts so I’ll try and get one out a week over the next six weeks.

  • The Effect of Altitude
  • How long does it take to adjust to altitude
  • What is the best altitude for living and training high?
  • How much improvement will take place with acclimatization?
  • Does everyone respond the same to altitude training?
  • How long at sea level can you take advantage of any altitude improvement?

Born To Rest

One of our clients worked with the guys over at BodyFix Method and she highly recommended their services for anyone suffering from a running related injury. I checked out their site and stumbled upon an interesting article, “Beware the Chair.” The average human apparently sits in a chair 9 hours a day. If you add in sleepy time we’re talking 3/4 of your day sitting and sleeping. We’re the Born to Rest generation! Our ancestors survived through running so we could all sit back and relax, I guess.

Another Reason Not To Run With An iPod

Zaphgod's Flickr page

Came across a great post today on Sweat Science, “Is exercising with your iPod making you stupid?” Clearly, heading out the door for a run with a listening device increases your risk of injury, yet many runners are willing to take that chance because music either helps them get a better workout or provides extra motivation to get out the door. Music can certainly make a long run less monotonous as well. But what if all this uninterrupted stimulation via digital technology is causing us to forfeit crucial downtime for our brains that helps us learn and remember more leading to more creativity and thoughtfulness? Would you put down your iPod then?