Feeling The Impulse To Race

By Rod Koborsi

There are times in everyone’s running life where you feel the need to jump in a race that you are not quite prepared for. We would all love to be 100% prepared for every race but, as most can attest, life sometimes gets in the way. For some it’s the decision to sign up for next month’s marathon because you feel the need to accomplish something right away. Others might be fighting an injury and after time off want to suddenly jump in a race. And many of you up north may have had to deter training plans because a snow storm. No matter the circumstance, there are a few tips that every runner should keep in mind when feeling the impulse to race.

Speed Workouts For A 26.2 Mile Race?

By Mike Smith

A question I get many times from the runners I interact with is “What place does speedwork have in training for a 26 mile race, Mike?” The question is a good one; in a race so far, wouldn’t you want to just get good at running for a long time? Why would anyone need to practice running fast?  It turns out that faster workouts don’t only have to be performed because you want to be a sprinter. These types of workouts can play an important part in preparing for longer races as well.

Preventing Injuries With Active Release

By Brian Rosetti

Throughout my experiences as a coach and runner/guinea pig for my athletes, I’ve learned a lot about injury treatment and prevention. Over the course of my career I’ve had my fair share of injuries but I’ve always tried to learn as much as possible throughout the process to prevent future problems. Over time I’ve avoided serious setbacks more often and one big reason for that is the success I’ve had working with certified active release practitioners. Here’s why:

Tips For Facing The Wind

Dr. Jack Daniels provides great training advice for “Facing the Wind.” When training in adverse conditions, particularly in the winter, runners have to face windy conditions. It’s important to understand how it can impact your training and that you come up with a plan to deal with the wind before your workout.

Winter Running Footwear Tips

By Vince Sherry

I wince every time I see more than a couple inches of snow in the forecast. It’s ironic, considering one of my favorite Bill Bowerman quotes is “there’s no such thing as bad weather, only soft people.”

This is a relatively new qualm of mine. I grew up in Rochester, NY. Since Rochester rarely sees the sun in the winter (and the winter is very long), the snow sticks around much longer. But I never missed a day of running due to snow in Rochester, and the fresh white powder made the otherwise dismal winter landscape a little more pleasing to the eye. I actually enjoyed running on snowy days. So what happened?

Take Back Your Run

By Blake Boldon

As Christmas and New Year’s quickly approach, we runners find ourselves in the middle of the most challenging time of year to train.  The stress associated with normal work obligations, family commitments and social events is amplified by seasonal deadlines, holiday celebrations and travel.  Adding insult to injury, days are nauseatingly short and the characteristically brutal weather conditions can send even the insanely brave among us scampering for the nearest treadmill.

Winter Running Tips

Winter Running Tips

By Rod Koborsi

As a Houston native, I never ran indoors, never ran in pants, and wouldn’t dare be seen in tights. Then again, I had never seen more than three inches of snow. As I ventured into the world  and experienced winter training in Washington, DC and Colorado Springs, I realized that my stubborn ways had to change or I would risk injury or illness that could have been easily prevented.

Running Advice Articles From Run SMART Coaches

For the past eight weeks Run SMART coaches have been contributing original content to our blog on all sorts of running-related topics. Our goal is to share a new article from one of our esteemed coaches on a different running topic each week. This is a great opportunity to learn more about the sport from the insightful viewpoints of our elite coaching staff.

So far we’ve posted Learning How To Concentrate and the Three Most Important Tips For Beginners by Mike Smith. Dr. Jack Daniels, via Flotrack and Saucony, shared his thoughts on cross training for runners. Blake Boldon wrote about what he believes to be the Three Fundamental Principles of Running. Vince Sherry covered When to Get New Running Shoes. Brian Rosetti brought us Learning How To Recover Properly.

Learning How To Concentrate Can Improve Your Running

“Staying on Task”

By Mike Smith

Fall 1998, I am a freshman, about two months into Division I collegiate running.  It’s a whole new world and I’m getting a hard introduction. My team is one of the best in the country and I am trying my hardest to hang on in yet another brutal practice. A dark fall day, the older runners pull away again, leaving me behind in another interval session. What am I doing here? I feel like I am trying so hard but I just keep getting dropped. Every workout.

When To Get New Running Shoes

Question:  Should I get new running shoes for the marathon, and if so – when?

Run SMART Coach Vince Sherry:  This question is a good one (as well as a common one) that marathoners often ask me about one week before the big day. It is most often part of the final pre-marathon panic. In the quest to make sure everything is perfect for race day, runners will look to their shoes at some point. Unfortunately, it’s often when the race is right around the corner, which leads me to my first tip; never purchase running shoes in a pressured state. A rushed decision is not usually a very good one. Try to plan ahead and get your marathon race-day shoes at least two weeks prior to the race. You should be lining up with around 20 to 40 miles on your trainers (less if your wearing racing flats).

If you’re fairly certain that your running shoes have more than 150 miles on them I would recommend getting a fresh pair. It’s not that your current shoes are shot at that point (in fact that’s about half the mileage a modest pair of trainers would give you), they’re just not 100%. The marathon will likely be the toughest event you run all season. You should give your feet as much cushioning as possible on race day. You will likely finish with less wear and tear and recover faster as a result. If you do end up purchasing a new pair a couple of weeks out make sure they are the same model as the shoes you’ve been running in for the current training period. This is not a time to try something new (unless the shoe you’ve been in has been giving you serious trouble).

Read Vince’s complete response at NYDailyNews.com