Ask Dr. Jack Daniels – Crowdsourced Edition

We’d like to thank all of our followers on social media for submitting these great questions. We hope Jack’s tips are helpful when considering your future training/racing.

Ken G:  In the weeks leading up to the start of a marathon training program what are some things an athlete can do to help prepare?

JD:  Try to get into a desirable daily schedule, including an easy morning run a few days each week, even if there is to also be something done in the afternoon. Just make the total mileage not vary much each week and get in about 6 weeks of just easy running and 6 or 8 strides in the middle of these easy runs.

Albert D:  What are some of your favorite workouts to help prepare for a marathon?

Stride Rate: A Step In The Right Direction

[Editor’s NoteMany runners and coaches have heard that 180 steps per minute is a proper cadence and that comes from Dr. Daniels’ observing/counting the steps of elite runners in the 1984 Olympics. Some get fixated on hitting a rate of 180 but there are so many variables in terms of speed, goals, and the running background of the individual. The main point gets lost and that’s reducing landing shock to help prevent injuries and avoid overstriding. If you read Jack’s book, Daniels’ Running Formula, the section title in Chapter 5 illustrates this point, “Stride Rate:  A Step In The Right Direction”]

Try Back-To-Back Quality Days When Training In-Season

By Dr. Jack Daniels

Many coaches ask how to organize Quality training during weeks they are racing. Sometimes you just have to try different things to determine what’s best for your runners. First, I like to always have two Easy days before a race. If it’s a really important race then your last Quality workout should be 3-4 days before. Also, when organizing training always consider that peak muscle soreness comes 48-hours after being stressed rather than just 24-hours after stress.

Be Different In 2018 – Set New Types Of Goals

We always focus on achieving the physiological goals of training to improve a runner’s fitness and race times. This year consider other ways to help achieve better outcomes and your most enjoyable year of running yet.

Below are very achievable goals which can lead towards long term progress. You just gotta commit to trying something new this year. Be different in 2018!

Factors To Consider When Running In Cold Weather

By Dr. Jack Daniels

There are several considerations relative to outdoor running in cold weather.

Footing

Has there been snow on the ground and have sidewalks or streets plowed for snow? The problem here is that it is usually safer to run on a couple inches of snow than on a plowed or scraped surface which can be slippery. Stay off of ice when possible.

How To Approach Pacing A 10k?

Run SMART:  Do you have any general tips on how to approach pacing a 10k?

Dr. Jack Daniels:  I think the best approach would be to start off treating a 10k as if it is a Threshold effort, and after a couple miles, if that is not feeling too bad, then try picking up the pace a little bit.  Most people start races too fast so the approach is to start as if you are racing a farther distance than the race actually is and see how you are feeling.  You should still be comfortable breathing with a 2-2 rhythm when arriving at the 4-mile mark, a sign you haven’t gone out too fast. The last couple miles may require a 2-1 rhythm, but 2-2 the whole way is good. Always best to finish a race saying you think you could have gone a little faster than to wish you hadn’t gone out too fast.

How To Utilize Heart Rate To Become A Better Runner

By Dr. Jack Daniels

  • Every training session should have a purpose that improves one of the following physiological functions:
    1. Heart and sport-muscle strengthening
    2. Endurance
    3. Aerobic fitness
    4. Anaerobic fitness
    5. Speed
    6. Economy of movement

Treadmill Running, Part II – Training Types

By Dr. Jack Daniels

There are really only two types of training a person can do: steady running and intermittent running. By steady running I mean a non-stop run at a consistent intensity. The intensity may be very easy, as at the beginning of a warm-up, during cool-downs or during recovery runs; or it may be moderate, as when running at Marathon pace or Threshold pace. Any intensity faster than threshold pace will usually be associated with intermittent running, as during Interval or Repetition workouts, types of training that stress the aerobic system or that work on mechanics, speed and economy.

Setbacks To Success

By Dr. Jack Daniels

We hear a lot about “overtraining,” whatever that is. Some people call it “staleness,” others just say you are in a state of “athletic depression,” or, that you are “over-worked.” Researchers all over the country; no, all over the world, are trying to figure out how to identify overtraining and how to reverse the process so useful training can begin.

I prefer to spend my training energy toward something more beneficial – avoiding overtraining, by devising long-range programs that lead to not-so-fast improvements, but do lead to continuous progress over the best years of an athlete’s productive career.