Why Active Release Technique (ART)?

By Dr. Sebastian Gonzales

Active Release Technique (ART) is a patented, highly advanced, and specific treatment method for soft tissue injuries, nerve entrapment, and decreased/limited range of motion and flexibility.

Upon examination of the injured area, ART sessions will include a combination of pressure applied by the practitioner and specific movement from the patient. This combination of pressure and movement will provide a targeted and specific treatment to the affected area.

Science On The Run: Ultrarunning Spotlight, Part I

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

In this first post of a four-part series on ultra-running, I’ll address some of the physical deterioration associated with ultra-running. While physical activity by way of running is a very healthy endeavor, with extreme exertion comes health risks. A growing number of researchers are investigating whether these risks outweigh the benefits.

Science on the Run: Get Up and Glute!

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

We all know we could work more on our glutes. But who actually commits to it? While I know its importance, I’ve easily lost motivation in my attempts at prehab for many self-proclaimed ‘good’ reasons – change in schedule, fatigue, sickness, or no longer being injured! A physio-runner-friend of mine even setup a three-week challenge, complete with filmed exercises posted on Facebook to make it convenient for her and her peers to stay on track. I think 90% of us failed to do the exercises every day.

Science on the Run: Pesky Ankle or Knee Issues? Consider Your Midsole.

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By Nikki Reiter

With all the different types of running shoes on the market, have you ever stopped to wonder whether a softer or harder shoe truly affects how you run? Do they prevent injuries? I’ve previously discussed the importance of perceived comfort when choosing a shoe. Here I present how the qualities of the shoe midsole can relate to injury potential.

Part I: How To Become A Faster Runner Through Cross Training

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By Malindi Elmore

Why do so many runners loath cross training? I know that I was firmly in the I-hate-cross-training camp for too many years. I think it is a combination of factors that result in this hatred for something that is beneficial to your running. Over the course of my 20-year career as a runner I have had more experience cross training than I care to count – 6 major injuries, pregnancy and a transition to being a multi-sport athlete has required that I sweat out hours aqua-jogging, biking, swimming, etc.

How Functional Are Your Core Strength Exercises?

By Caroline Varriale

Most runners know that having a strong core is essential to running efficiency. After all, what is connecting our legs and arms as we fly from one side to the other? Our trunk and core are perhaps the most important part of our body to strengthen and train, and running is an extremely challenging activity for the core to stabilize.

Science on the Run: What Are We Without Our Feet?

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Being injured sucks. I recently hit a setback to my post-maternity training due to some ‘stop-me-dead-in-my-tracks’ arch pain. From this stems a reminder for ‘prehab, prehab, prehab!’ This personal incident comes along with an aptly timed publication about a new paradigm concerning foot health – the ‘foot core system.’

While we traditionally associate our ‘core’ with our pelvic region (and all the muscles that insert into it), this new publication highlights that the foot also has its own core, comprising of ‘intrinsic muscles’ (meaning the muscles fully contained within the foot) that are largely ignored when it comes to the typical muscles we associate with running.

Science on the Run: Whip Those Glutes Into Shape!

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Image credit Colorado Physical Therapy Specialists (Medial Heel Whip)

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Glute weakness is often considered one of the main culprits of running injuries. Run too much without the muscular support of the pelvis and core, and BAM! – IT band issues, patellofemoral pain, shin splints, foot pain, etc. Statistically, it has probably happened to each of us at some point in our running careers.

How do you know if you have weak glutes? Chances are if you are a member of today’s society, you are affected to some degree. Prolonged sitting is typically credited with being the reason. How do you know if your glutes are really weak? Well, one gait pattern you can look at is how your foot moves from behind your body at push-off, or whether you experience ‘heel whip.’

Science on the Run: Our Body’s Wise Approach to Running

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Multiple World-Record Holder Ed Whitlock, Canada.com

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Like younger runners, many older runners are greatly concerned with suffering an injury. As we age, our bodies are susceptible to more running injuries, perhaps due to other existing injuries, reduced flexibility or reduced muscle strength. A recently published article investigated whether ‘coordination variability’ in running mechanics is lower in older runners.

NOW Is The Best Time To Get Strong

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By Caroline Varriale

Let’s be honest, it’s easy to do what we love. The things that come most naturally to us and are rewarding are the ones that we inevitably turn to over and over again.

For those of us who enjoy running, we know it’s something we stubbornly keep coming back to—despite injury, training setbacks, terrible races and doctors telling us we shouldn’t run. There is just something about being out there—when it’s just you and earth and sky—that is clarifying and exhilarating.