Treadmill Running, Part II – Training Types

By Dr. Jack Daniels

There are really only two types of training a person can do: steady running and intermittent running. By steady running I mean a non-stop run at a consistent intensity. The intensity may be very easy, as at the beginning of a warm-up, during cool-downs or during recovery runs; or it may be moderate, as when running at Marathon pace or Threshold pace. Any intensity faster than threshold pace will usually be associated with intermittent running, as during Interval or Repetition workouts, types of training that stress the aerobic system or that work on mechanics, speed and economy.

Treadmill Running, Part I – How Boring

By Dr. Jack Daniels

Most of us like to think that one of the advantages runners have over other athletes, or, more simply stated, running has over many other types of aerobic exercise, is the simplicity and freedom of the sport. You really can run just about anywhere, and for free. I remember coaching a sailor during the Gulf War, who was 6-4 and weighed 185 pounds, and he maintained an 80-mile-per-week program for most of a year.  This sounds reasonable enough for someone training for a marathon, but when you consider he was limited to doing all of his running on the deck of an aircraft carrier, treadmill running doesn’t seem quite so limiting after all.

Dr. Jack Daniels: Utilizing The Treadmill To Help Prepare For Boston

[Editor’s Note:  The key to training effectively for the Boston Marathon is how well you strategically incorporate undulating terrain in your workouts. But what if you don’t have easy access to undulating terrain? We asked the master on how a runner can utilize the treadmill to help prepare for the course at Boston.]

By Dr. Jack Daniels

Most important is to not do too much or too steep downhill running as this really stresses the quads. I’d suggest only about 2% grade (both during uphill and downhill running on the treadmill. The speed will be about 10-12 seconds per mile faster than anticipated flat marathon pace when running downhill and about 12-15 sec per mile slower than flat marathon pace when running uphill.

Dr. Jack Daniels’ Sample Treadmill Hill Workout

Hills are a great way to improve your speed/running economy. They serve the same purpose as 200m or 400m Reps but with added resistance. One downside of doing hill repeats outside is all the impact/stress from running easy back down the hill. A great way to avoid this and mix up your training is to try it on a treadmill.

Below is a sample treadmill hill repeat workout that Dr. Daniels loves prescribing for his athletes. Pictured above, you can see Ryan Hall in the middle of a similar workout from Jack!

Heidi Peoples Shares Her Favorite Marathon Workout

Last week we asked Run SMART coach Rod Koborsi what his favorite workout was. This week Heidi Peoples shares her favorite. Both coaches keep it simple and seem to favor something of a steady state run because it helps boost their confidence before a race.

Heidi: During the winter (coldness and darkness) it was difficult if not impossible to get on a track in the early morning when I run. Therefore, my favorite workout involved a reliable partner – my treadmill!  The goal of the workout is to run 10 miles slightly under my marathon race pace. To prepare for it I make sure I am well hydrated the night before and try to get a decent amount of sleep. Then, I head to the basement and create a relaxed setting – dim lights, turn the TV to my favorite station (VH1 actually has videos on in the AM!) and start out running relaxed, gradually increasing the pace until I reach 10 miles.