What Is The Purpose Of Training At 5k Race Pace?

“I’m not against it, but I have a hard time justifying the physiological benefits of running at 5k or 10k race pace. Now for an excellent runner 5k race pace is right around Interval pace.” – Coach Daniels

For instance, if you’re a 23-minute 5k runner your race pace is 7:24 and your Interval or VO2max training pace is 7:13 per mile. To learn more about how each training pace compares to your 5k and 10k race paces and the physiological purpose of Intervals use the VDOT Calculator.

For more training advice join Dr. Daniels at the next VDOT O2 Coaching Clinic at GU Energy Labs in Berkeley, CA on August 8th.

Science on the Run: Get Up and Glute!

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Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

We all know we could work more on our glutes. But who actually commits to it? While I know its importance, I’ve easily lost motivation in my attempts at prehab for many self-proclaimed ‘good’ reasons – change in schedule, fatigue, sickness, or no longer being injured! A physio-runner-friend of mine even setup a three-week challenge, complete with filmed exercises posted on Facebook to make it convenient for her and her peers to stay on track. I think 90% of us failed to do the exercises every day.

Cross Training: But Does It Really Work For Running?

IMG_0142[Parts one, two and three of Malindi’s four-part series on “How To Become A Faster Runner Through Cross Training” can be found herehere and here.]

By Malindi Elmore

When I was a “pure runner” who supplemented cross training in times of injury or for the purposes of injury prevention, I was very skeptical of the benefits, and rightly so, because I was not doing it properly!

What I have tried to convey in my previous posts is that cross training should be approached as actual training. It should also be structured and goal-oriented, just like your running. Doing an easy 30-minute spin session with your heart rate barely above resting does not qualify as cross training; nor does going at a frantic heart-bursting intensity.

Science on the Run: Pesky Ankle or Knee Issues? Consider Your Midsole.

UntitledLinking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

With all the different types of running shoes on the market, have you ever stopped to wonder whether a softer or harder shoe truly affects how you run? Do they prevent injuries? I’ve previously discussed the importance of perceived comfort when choosing a shoe. Here I present how the qualities of the shoe midsole can relate to injury potential.

Part 3: How To Do A Swim Workout

By Malindi ElmoreIMG_0068

[Parts 1 and 2 of Malindi’s four-part series on “How To Become A Faster Runner Through Cross Training” can be found here and here.]

Instead of going for a long/slow swim you’ll get more out of your workout at threshold effort. This translates into improved swimming and also makes sure you are working hard enough to benefit your running fitness.

When To Start Training For Your 2015 Fall Marathon

IMG_0593The following are the most popular fall marathons we customize training plans for and when our 18 and 15-week schedules start for this year’s race.

We recommend 18-weeks of training if you’ve been running fairly consistently but are not in great race shape when starting the plan. 15-weeks is better if you’re in good racing shape and you’ve already been doing some quality workouts. Sometimes the longer the training plan the more risk of overtraining.

Science on the Run: Carbohydrates For A Kick!

UntitledLinking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

Pacing is our body’s way of preserving energy and it is suggested to occur both consciously and subconsciously from our brain and local muscles. Pacing requires a complex integration of brain and muscle signals that is highly debated as the Central Governor theory (the brain) vs. the Peripheral Fatigue model (read more here) with the purpose of keeping our bodies from harming themselves through excessive exertion.

How Swimming Can Make You A Faster Runner

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[Editor’s note:  Part 1 of Malindi’s four-part series on “How To Become A Faster Runner Through Cross Training” can be found here.]

By Malindi Elmore

Why do so many runners hate cross training? We are very goal-oriented and we revel in measurable data. We like to know how far and how fast we ran. Cross training puts us in a foreign situation where often the data is less quantifiable, and we do not have a reference point for our progress. This is why I strongly suggest having a purpose and goals for your non-running endurance training activities and not just approaching it in a haphazard way.

Science on the Run: “Better Short Than Never!”

By Nikki Reiter

Do you plan your workout intensity? Does this ever deter you from your workout effort, or maybe deter you from starting the workout altogether?

Research has been published comparing rating of perceived exertion (RPE) responses before, during and after continuous and ‘high-intensity interval training’ (HIIT) exercise trials.

Apparently, RPE has been shown to change in relation to the same session, depending on ‘when’ it is asked.

Part I: How To Become A Faster Runner Through Cross Training

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By Malindi Elmore

Why do so many runners loath cross training? I know that I was firmly in the I-hate-cross-training camp for too many years. I think it is a combination of factors that result in this hatred for something that is beneficial to your running. Over the course of my 20-year career as a runner I have had more experience cross training than I care to count – 6 major injuries, pregnancy and a transition to being a multi-sport athlete has required that I sweat out hours aqua-jogging, biking, swimming, etc.