Get Your Heat-Adjusted Pace For Chicago This Weekend

Chicago Marathon organizers are expecting a high of 75 degrees this Sunday. Ideal marathon temps are generally in the mid-to-high 40’s fahrenheit, so it’s important to adjust your pace early to avoid a major meltdown (vicious pun intended) 😉 in the second half.

In the example pictured above, someone shooting for a 3:49 marathon would typically average 8:44 per mile. To avoid running a harder effort than you’re trained for in warmer conditions, if you click advanced features on the VDOT Calculator and add in an anticipated temp of 68 degrees (assuming mid-race conditions), the equivalent effort in those temps is about 7 seconds slower or 8:51 per mile. Over a 26.2 mile race that type of discrepancy in your pacing can make the difference between hitting the wall and losing lots of time in the last 8-10 miles and staying relatively steady throughout.

Use our running calculator (embedded below) to determine your heat-adjusted marathon pace and follow Dr. Daniels’ advice:

I’d go for the heat-adjusted pace for 15-20 miles, then if feeling OK, try picking it up a  little.  Much better to run a little slower than you would like to have done, and finish being able to say, “I think I could have gone a little faster,” than to end up saying, “I wish I hadn’t gone out so fast.”

Science on the Run: Bad Posture = Bad Runner

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

As a fidgety-runner-type-who-hates-sitting-at-her-desk and worries about maintaining good posture, I’ve been incorporating stretching a few times a day, in addition to multiple walks to fill up my cup at the water station and my mid-day run (with all these breaks, you probably wonder how I ever get any work done!) Personally, I’m more productive this way as it allows me to work in concentrated time slots with a clear mind.

How To Increase Your Weekly Mileage

Dr. Jack Daniels’ principles on increasing weekly mileage:

  • Increase weekly mileage by as many miles as the number of runs you do each week
    • Increase by 5 miles per week if running 5x per week
    • Never increase more than 10 miles
  • Stay with one amount of running for at least 4 weeks
    • Do not follow 10% weekly mileage increase rule
    • Let your body adjust to a certain amount of stress before increasing volume

More videos from Jack on YouTube.

Part 3, Race Kick: Tips And Workouts For Shifting Gears

By Malindi Elmore

[Parts 1 and 2 of “It’s All About The Kick” can be found here and here.]

Not all races are run at even paces, which is frustrating for people who are focused on running fast! However, slow starts, surges, bumps, jostles, elbows, trips, and dramatic sprint finishes are part of what makes races exciting and unpredictable. This is the part of the race that makes it a sport and not simply “who can run fast?” Embrace the unpredictable and go with the flow as much as possible (easier said than done at times!) – and always keep your focus on a strong finish!

Dr. Jack Daniels’ Sample Treadmill Hill Workout

Hills are a great way to improve your speed/running economy. They serve the same purpose as 200m or 400m Reps but with added resistance. One downside of doing hill repeats outside is all the impact/stress from running easy back down the hill. A great way to avoid this and mix up your training is to try it on a treadmill.

Below is a sample treadmill hill repeat workout that Dr. Daniels loves prescribing for his athletes. Pictured above, you can see Ryan Hall in the middle of a similar workout from Jack!

Part 2, Race Kick: Strength Or Speed?

By Malindi Elmore

[Part 1 of “It’s All About The Kick” can be found here.]

Many track runners think they must possess raw speed to win with a kick. This is simply not true. Kicking is often a relative term, and can almost be explained better as who slows down the least. The faster the pace, the more likely this is true. Pedestrian or championship “sit and kick” races are their own category and stranger things have been known to happen, so for the sake of this argument, let’s assume that the majority of the race is at a pace appropriate for the quality of the field assembled. (In Part 3  of this series I’ll discuss “Shifting Gears” for championship race kicks).

Get Your Temperature Adjustment

It’s hot out! As runners we dread the heat and humidity, especially when it hinders our performance. Fortunately, Dr. Jack Daniels’ formulas for temperature adjustment can now be utilized in our VDOT O2 Running Calculator app. No longer should runners be overtraining in the heat or be frustrated by not hitting their goal splits!

Here’s how it works and we’ve embedded the calculator below so you can try it out. [If you’d like to embed the calculator on your site grab the code here]

Science on the Run: Drills, What Are They Good For?

Linking current research to running

By Nikki Reiter

It’s likely you’ve heard that running drills will improve your technique to make you a more efficient runner. Some coaches claim that running drills are effective by way of simulating individual running phases, seeking to correct technique. However, research has shown that the method of performing those classic ‘As, Bs and Cs’ do not mimic the same muscular activation patterns as in running.

Personally, I see a lot of value in performing drills that gets the athlete practicing quick feet, explosiveness and maintaining good posture. They’re also a great way to warm up for a speed workout after a light jog – along with strides they prepare the body for quick movement and increase dynamic range of motion that would not be achievable through static stretching.